Printed from MyPardess.org

Pardess Offers Free Services For High Holidays

Pardess Offers Free Services For High Holidays

 Email

http://hudsonvalleynewsnetwork.com/
September 2015

Pardess Center For Jewish Life
Offers Free Services For High Holidays

Fishkill, NY – With just a few weeks before the onset of the Jewish New Year, there are still many Jews who have no plans to attend synagogue services this High Holiday season, said Rabbi Zalman Sandhaus of Pardess Center for Jewish Life. With this in mind, Pardess is offering friendly and welcoming services for free for the Southern Dutchess County Jewish community. The Center is located at 15 Aspen Court in Fishkill, however services will be held at 261 Baxtertown Road in Fishkill.

Symbols of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year: Shofar, apples, honey in glass honey dish, pomegranates, wine, silver Kiddush cup. Author-Gilabrand https://commons.wikimedia.org/

Symbols of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year: Shofar, apples, honey in glass honey dish, pomegranates, wine, silver Kiddush cup. Author-Gilabrand
https://commons.wikimedia.org/

While many may not be affiliated with a synagogue, other may find the cost unaffordable, particularly in light of today’s flailing economy said Rabbi Sandhaus.

“According to Jewish tradition, on the Jewish New Year, the doors of Heaven are open. G‑d accepts prayers from everyone,” said Rabbi Zalman Sandhaus. “The least we can do is open our doors as well to the entire community.”

By providing free Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur services in a warm and inclusive setting, Pardess hopes to accommodate those who may otherwise not be celebrating the holiday by creating “user-friendly” services for both the beginner and the advanced. Song, commentary and the use of English-Hebrew prayer books, enable those of all levels to become active participants in the services.

“The Lubavitcher Rebbe, of righteous memory, insisted that Judaism be accessible to all Jews. During the Jewish High Holidays, accessibility can translate into different factors for different people, such as a non-judgmental atmosphere, affordability of the services, or the ability for a beginner to follow along. Our goal is to lower the barriers of entry, and encourage each and every Jew to actively participate in these most holy and introspective days.”

Jews praying in the Synagogue on Yom Kippur. (1878 painting by Maurycy Gottlieb) https://en.wikipedia.org

Jews praying in the Synagogue on Yom Kippur. (1878 painting by Maurycy Gottlieb)
https://en.wikipedia.org

Rosh Hashanah begins this year at sundown on Sunday, September 13 and extends until nightfall on Tuesday, September 15. Yom Kippur begins this year after sundown on Tuesday, September 22 and extends until nightfall on Wednesday, September 23.

For more information or to reserve a space, visitwww.MyPardess.org/HighHolidays or call 845-440-7592

About the High Holidays

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year, is observed this year on the eve of September 13 through September 15. Meaning “head of the year” the two day holiday commemorates the creation of the world and marks the beginning of the Days of Awe, a 10-day period of introspection and repentance that culminates in the Yom Kippur holiday.

Yom Kippur—the Day of Atonement—is considered the holiest day of on the Jewish calendar. Beginning this year on the evening of September 23 until after nightfall on September 23, it marks the culmination of the 10 Days of Awe, a period of introspection and repentance that follows Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. According to tradition, G‑d decides each person’s fate on this day, so Jews mark the day by making amends and asking forgiveness for sins committed during the past year. The holiday is observed by fasting and prayers.

*The custom of substituting the word “God” with G‑d in English is based on the traditional practice in Jewish law of giving God’s Hebrew name a high degree of respect and reverence.

 Email
Judaic School of the Arts

Where children learn and love their Judaism!

 
Holiday Programs

Experience each holiday and the meaning behind it.

 
Cteen

Chabad Teen Network. The Chabad Global network for teens

 
Kosher

Eating Jewishly

 
Mezuzah

The Jewish security system

 
One-on-One Learning

Study Torah with the Rabbi